5 Tips for Veterans Transitioning Back Into Civilian Life

For those finishing their military duty, the transition back to civilian life can be stressful and difficult. Military veterans suddenly find themselves faced with finding employment and moving forward in a society that often does not understand what they endured during their military tenure. By using the right tools and resources, however, veterans can learn to successfully reintegrate with society and their families. Here are five tips that all military veterans should consider.

Work with a mentor

A mentor, another person who understands the challenges associated with transitioning back to civilian life, can be an enormous asset. Career Attraction mentions that there are a variety of different professional mentorship programs available to vets. Mentorship can also be on a more personal level with a good friend or close family member who exited the military a few years earlier. A mentor will be able to offer guidance on how to deal with the various stressors associated with leaving the military, veterans benefits, how to begin a job hunt, and may even be able to help with the job search personally.

See how experiences and credentials translate towards a degree

Finding a job can be one of the first major challenges faced by veterans. When in the military, people find themselves gaining a number of skills that can be put towards a degree. A number of adult education programs, such as vocational training programs, will be willing to work with members of the military to see if these specific skills can be translated into class credits that can be put towards a degree or certification. Even if the unique military skills cannot be used for class credit, they can be advantageous for being accepted into a more competitive trade school.

Look for military scholarships

Military scholarships can be an excellent resource for those looking to return to school after military service. Those looking to enter various vocational training programs, such as welding certification training, may find that scholarships can help them complete the career training program quickly and affordably so they begin civilian life with their certifications and ready for work. Some students might also be eligible for financial aid.

Connect with others from the service

Military members transitioning back to civilian life may find themselves facing a number of different emotions. They may miss the camaraderie that military life brings or even find themselves struggling with the different types of stress that comes with day to day life. Nothing helps people cope with feelings of being alone or isolated better than having a strong community. As Make the Connection, a support site for veterans, notes, connecting with others who have served can help bridge the transition from one world into the next.

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Connecting with others can also provide a number of resources such as veterans’ benefits. Military members who are facing difficulties such as post-traumatic stress disorder should avail themselves of counseling and other services designed for veterans.

Be active in the job search

Being active with the job search can help these former military members find the right position much more quickly. Career Attraction notes that there are a number of events such as veteran-specific job fairs that help those who have a military background get connected with various companies. Many companies recognize the unique skill sets that those who have served in the armed forces can bring to the job market, including leadership skills and ingenuity, and specifically seek former members of the military to hire.

Reentering civilian life can be a considerable challenge for many veterans. Taking the time to properly prepare for the transition and finding work in desirable field can help the process go smoother. Keep the above guidelines in mind and begin the challenge of becoming a civilian once again.

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