female welder portrait

The State of Women in the Welding Industry in 2018

female welder portrait

Welding is considered a boy’s club, right?

Yes, but it’s not necessarily true. While it might be a male-dominated industry, the reality is that women have been pushing their way through welding for many years now. In fact, 2018 might be the perfect time for women interested in skilled trades to pursue a career in welding.

Why?

For starters, the metal fabrication industry is predicting that 2018 will be a good year for the sector, as it is expanding in aerospace, defense and heavy industrial areas.

The agriculture industry is rebounding, and infrastructure spending may pick up if the federal government follows through with its plans.

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The construction and automotive industry are going strong, partly due to the various natural disasters in late 2017.[1]

But the persisting skilled worker shortage might still stifle the market. We need more welders, and women can fit the role.

We’ve rounded up some past posts that talk about women in welding and spotlighted them below.

Women Welders in WWII

Prior to World War II, women were largely confined to being homemakers. Few were actually part of the workforce.

When men were drafted for the military, however, women had to replace them at their jobs. As the war went on, the need for aircrafts, artillery and machinery grew. Women all over the country were working in metal factories, contributing to America’s victory and booming post-WWII economy.

Most importantly, they changed how society viewed women in the workplace and ushered in the era of the modern working woman.

Read the full article.

Why Skilled Trades Can Be Great for Women

Women only make up a third of middle–skill position, working in jobs that typically pay less than welding, but working in a middle-skill position can increase their earnings.

Some women prefer non-traditional work environments typically found in corporate offices. Welding provides that kind of environment. Expect a lot of variety and a lot of destinations.

As we mentioned earlier, the skilled trades are hurting for qualified employees. Women might find more opportunity in trades than in other middle-skill careers.

Read the full article.

What Women Considering a Career in Welding Should Know

Demand for skilled workers, including welders, is increasing as baby boomers retire and a number of industries are expanding.

Welding is a flexible and active job that can be attractive to those who do not wish to spend all day in an office.

The salary of a welder is often higher than that of traditionally female-dominated careers.

It is also a good option if you want to switch careers mid-life, as training can be finished in less than a year.

Read the full article.

Women Entering Welding 4 Stories of Success

Sometimes it’s best to hear it straight from the source. Read our profile of four successful women welders.

Their stories demonstrate how rewarding a relatively “unconventional” career choice can be and that women interested in welding should not hesitate to enter this trade.

Welding Gear For Women

Since so many welders are guys, women struggle with the lack of range in sizes and types for items such as gloves, helmet, and goggles. Ill-fitting or altered gear can pose a serious safety risk, so finding the right gear that properly fits is critical.

Read the full article.

TWS strives to include women in its welding training program and help women increase their participation in the welding industry. If you are looking for a career that allows for flexibility and variety, contact us today for more information about becoming a welder.

Sources: [1] https://www.thefabricator.com/article/shopmanagement/2018-forecast-another-year-of-growth-for-metal-fabricators