Transition From The Military to a Career in Welding

Leaving the military and rejoining the civilian world is often achieved with help from the GI Bill. While some veterans may use the GI Bill to obtain a college degree, its use is not limited to traditional college settings. In fact, the GI Bill can often open doors to successful and satisfying careers, like welding. These careers can be achieved through vocational training at Tulsa Welding School.

Uncovering Financial Aid for Training

According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, veterans can use the GI Bill and other military scholarships to attend paid training at a trade school. Depending on the time spent on training, the amount of the scholarships and awards given can vary. Payments are established prior to the month needed, making financial aid available before it is due.

In addition to using the GI Bill to gain vital training in an exciting career like welding, former military members may find help in attending vocational schools like Tulsa Welding School by seeking military scholarships. Military scholarships offer financial aid for both current and former military members and can be a great way to obtain money for further education and career training. Uncovering available military scholarships can be as easy as searching the web for legitimate opportunities and applying.

Military Service Translates Well to Welding Careers

Allowing veterans to use their military benefits for vocational school has opened the doors to exciting career opportunities for many men and women. The U.S. has begun to recognize that many veterans enjoy working with their hands, and that the training they receive in the military can often translate very well to detail-oriented trades like welding. There is a skilled labor shortage in the country, and skilled and disciplined veterans who may not have had access to welding training before their military service can help plug that shortage with the help of the GI Bill and military scholarships.

Advancement and mastery are aspects of a welding career that many veterans from all branches of the armed forces find attractive when leaving the military and searching for alternative opportunities to attending a traditional college or university. In addition, welding is a career which is constantly evolving and advancing, making it an exciting opportunity that is never dull. According to the American Welding Society (AWS), welding also offers a variety of different careers and specialties within the field itself, giving students choices and different opportunities to branch out, grow, and concentrate. Welding also offers room for growth, with managerial positions and openings.

Tulsa Welding School has campuses in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Jacksonville, Florida, and both campuses draw students from all across the country. For information on how you can translate your military training into a career as a welder, contact Tulsa Welding School today.

For further information on this subject:
GI Bill Web Site
American Welding Society